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Providing non-judgmental and non-criticizing support for family and friends of end-stage alcoholics through one-on-one coaching, support groups, blog posts, workshops and public speaking.

Monday, October 14, 2013

I'm still here...

I see I’m being asked if I’m ever going to return to posting on this blog. The answer is YES. In fact, I’m working on a post right now, but don’t expect to find it today – probably on Tuesday or Wednesday.

Although Riley no longer drinks, his physical condition has become extremely demanding. He is left with dementia which is progressive in a downhill manner. When he was drinking, I thought nothing could be worse than that. I was wrong. The dementia is far worse. Thankfully, there is help on the horizon and I might be able to get back to some type of life of my own.

Please continue to support each other as I have seen you all doing over the past months. I do read your comments and happy to see that you respond to each other. Unfortunately, I’ve also been unable to answer my e-mail in a timely manner. I hope you will see an improvement over the next month.

Thank you for visiting my blog and continuing to read even when I haven’t been here. I appreciate all of you so very much. 

4 comments:

Syd said...

I'm sorry to hear about Riley's dementia. It certainly is a tough thing to witness. Sending good thoughts to you and him.

Anonymous said...

Finding your blog in April, and reading it still, has helped me more than you know. From learning what's happening physiologically, to allowing myself to see the humor in some of the situations that are far from funny. From this blog, I have learned so much and gained both strength and clarity. Thank you.

Prae said...

I have been married to an alcoholic for 37 years. He drank heavy for the first 16 years of our marriage and then was sober for 18 years with only a few short relapses. He has been drinking now for 3 years, end stage for about 11 months. He was end stage when I left the marriage after the first 16 years of active alcoholism. His sobriety brought him back to life and us back together with many years of him being very productive and supporting me and our children. It is so sad to witness this very handsome, talented, and intelligent man be overcome with the desire to drink with the inability to stop at this time in his life, he is now 70 years old. I am sad and he is sad and there is nothing we can do to console each other. A few minutes ago he told me he is what he is. He said he doesn't want anyone to be hurt by that. He just can't be someone else. He said he can not any longer fight his brain's desire to have alcohol in it. He told me his desire to have alcohol in his brain is stronger than my brain's desire for him to be sober. So, I know how instance he craves alcohol because I know how instance I crave his sobriety. I would do anything for him to get sober, he would do anything to keep alcohol in his brain. I respect his challenges and I think he has a lot of respect for mine.

Prae said...

The post I put up earlier corrected intense to instance. Sorry.

The post should read: "So, I know how intense he craves alcohol because I know how intense I crave his sobriety. I would do anything for him to get sober, he would do anything to keep alcohol in his brain. I respect his challenges and I think he has a lot of respect for mine."